March is Women’s Her-Story Month

Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani Activist, University of Oxford 2020 Graduate, and Youngest Nobel Prize Laureate 

https://malala.org/malalas-story

https://malala.org/our-work?sc=header

Malala Yousafzai’s lived experience of being targeted and shot in the face and surviving is a story of great courage. Her continued advocacy for safe and free education for girls around the world earned her a Nobel Prize. The Malala Fund has raised $22 million to fund girls’ education who otherwise would be prevented from going to school in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Brazil, Turkey, Ethiopia, Lebanon, and Nigeria. Education for Girls

Celebrating Women’s Firsts

Hidden Figures movie based on a true story about three African American women mathematicians who significantly helped NASA to win the Space Race.

“In 1961, a time of segregation and rampant racism and sexism, three African-American women overcame every challenge they faced and helped NASA in the early days of the Space Race. The record of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn and Mary Jackson is a story that was ignored until now.”

Hidden Figures Book Read for Children, read by the book’s illustrator, Laura Freeman.

Mary Jackson, NASA scientist (1961)

https://online.maryville.edu/blog/women-of-color-in-stem offers a list of amazing scientists for us to honor their contributions in STEM fields.

Bessie Coleman, First African American and Native American Pilot in the world
(1892-1926) 
https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/bessie-coleman 
“Bessie Coleman soared across the sky as the first African American, and the first Native American woman pilot. Known for performing flying tricks, Coleman’s nicknames were; “Brave Bessie,” “Queen Bess,” and “The Only Race Aviatrix in the World.” Her goal was to encourage women and African Americans to reach their dreams. Unfortunately, her career ended with a tragic plane crash, but her life continues to inspire people around the world.”

Mae Jemison is the First African American Woman Astronaut (1956- Present)
  •  https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/mae-jemison 
  • “As a doctor, engineer, and NASA astronaut, Mae Jemison has always reached for the stars. In 1992, Jemison became the first African American woman to travel in space. She has also written several books and appeared on many television programs including an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation. In addition to her many awards, Jemison has been inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame and the International Space Hall of Fame.”

Queen Liliuokalani, First and Last Queen to Rule Sovereign Hawaii (1838-1917)
  •  https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/queen-liliuokalani 
  • “Growing up in a royal family, Queen Lili‘uokalani was trained to be a monarch. Even though becoming queen was probably not a surprise to her, she may not have known that she would also become the last sovereign monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaii. Unfortunately, she was only able to reign for three years because the United States overthrew the Hawaiian monarchy. However, Lili‘uokalani published her side of the story in a memoir that became the only autobiography written by a Hawaiian monarch.”

Pacific IslandersPasifika, or Pasefika, are the peoples of the Pacific Islands. It is a geographic and ethnic/racial term to describe the inhabitants and diaspora of any of the three major sub-regions of Oceania (MicronesiaMelanesia, and Polynesia). It is also sometimes used to describe inhabitants of the Pacific islands (i.e. citizens of Pacific states who are of Asian and European descent who call the Pacific their home).

New Zealand has the largest concentration of Polynesian Pacific Islanders in the world—during the 20th century and into the 21st century the country saw a steady stream of immigration from Polynesian countries such as SamoaTonga, the Cook IslandsNiue, and French Polynesia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Islander

 

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